Bull Terrier


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Bull Terrier
Vital Statistics:
Place of Origin: England
Group: Terrier, Sporting, Companion
Height: Standard 20-24 in., mini 10-14 in.
Weight: Standard 45-80lbs., mini 15-35 lbs.
Life span: 10-14 yrs.
Trainability: moderate
Good with children: questionable
Good with other pets: no

What is the origin of the Bull Terrier?

The Bull Terrier counts among its ancestors, the Bulldog, Old English Terrier and Spanish Pointer. In the 1830s people considered combat between bulldogs and bulls as sport. They wanted an even more tenacious dog to fight bulls and developed the Bull Terrier.

What does the Bull Terrier look like?

The Standard Bull Terrier's body is broad, muscular and rounded. Height is 20-24 inches, weight about 45-80 lbs. The miniature version is 10-14 inches tall and weighs 15-35 lbs. Its distinctive head is egg-shaped, curving smoothly from the top to the nose. Eyes are small, triangular and black or dark brown. Ears are small, erect and point straight up. The tail is carried horizontally and is short and tapering. The coat is short and dense, Colors are white, black, brindle, red, fawn and tri-color.

What is the temperament of the Bull Terrier?

The Bull Terrier has a very strong character. This former ferocious bull fighter has bcome a loyal dog. Highly intelligent, it needs careful socialization and training with a firm hand so that it knows you are the leader. Patience is also needed as the Bull Terrier may be a bit difficult to train. They are very loyal and devoted to their family and love children. They do not get along with other dogs or small pets. They should not be left alone for long periods of time or they become destructive. This energetic dog needs daily exercise, at least a long walk.

What are the uses of the Bull Terrier?

The Bull Terrier has been used as a livestock guard, mouser, bodyguard and watchdog. It is very protective of its family.

Possible Health Issues

Deafness, kidney disease, heart disease, patellar luxation, skin and coat disorders.